Issue - meetings

Motions on Notice 2015-16 (complete)

Meeting: 18/04/2016 - Council (Item 120)

120 Motions on notice pdf icon PDF 130 KB

This item has a time limit of 60 minutes.

 

The full text of motions received by the Head of Law and Governance in accordance with Council Procedure Rule 11.17 by the deadline of 1.00pm on 6 April 2016 is below. Motions will be taken in turn from the, Green, and Labour, Liberal Democrat groups in that order.

 

Substantive amendments to these motions must be sent by councillors to the Head of Law and Governance by no later than 1.00pm on 14 April 2016. The briefing note will list amendments submitted before its publication.

 

Council is asked to consider the following eight motions:

 

1.    Oxford City Council support EU membership (proposed by Cllr Craig Simmons, seconded by Cllr Elise Benjamin)

 

Green member motion

 

Oxford is an international City, with three EU twin towns, and a proud City of Sanctuary. The last census in 2011 showed that 1 in 10 of its resident population were born in EU countries other than UK.

The City Council has benefited directly from more than £1m of EU funding and, in May 2015, the City’s Finance Panel took evidence from three of the South East regions MEPs identifying more than seven other potential EU funding streams that the City Council could apply for.

Oxford’s economy also benefits enormously from EU tourism (9 out of the top 10 countries of origin are other EU states), from EU funding to its Universities, and other institutions, and from European businesses, such as BMW, that have chosen to operate within the City and County.

Workers in Oxford are better off as a result of EU employment directives on equal rights, holidays, pensions, working hours, health and safety and so on.

Oxford residents have more opportunities and lower costs when travelling as a result of the EU, free movement, lower mobile phone charges, European health card, educational possibilities and so on.

Oxford’s environment has also benefited from EU legislation and guidance on, for example, air quality, recycling and biodiversity.

This Council therefore believes that the case for staying within the EU is overwhelming beneficial for the City and urges those electors eligible to vote to back an ‘IN’ vote at the forthcoming EU Referendum and asks the Leader to write to Oxford’s MPs setting out the Council’s views.

Of course, the EU is not perfect. But neither is Westminster. It needs to be more democratically accountable, transparent and efficient. This Council, however, believes that reform will be easier if the UK remains within the EU.

 

 

2.    Unitary Council proposal (proposed by Councillor Price)

 

Labour member motion

 

The City Council notes that the response from government to the devolution proposals for Oxfordshire that were presented to the Department of Communities and Local Government and Cabinet Office in December 2015 indicated that a different and stronger form of governance was required if the proposals were to make progress.

Council therefore welcomes the initiative from the five District Councils in partnership with South Northants and Cotswold District Councils for a revised proposal based on  ...  view the full agenda text for item 120

Minutes:

Council had before it eight motions on notice and amendments submitted in accordance with Council procedure rule 11.17, and reached decisions as set out below.

 

 

1.    Oxford City Council support EU membership

 

Councillor Simmons proposed his submitted motion, agreeing to amend this to also incorporate the motion submitted by Councillor Tanner (Motion 5 on the agenda). Councillor Tanner seconded this.

 

After debate, and on being put to the vote, the motion as amended by the proposer was declared carried.

 

Council resolved to adopt the motion as set out below:

 

This Council strongly supports remaining in the European Union in the referendum and urges all Oxford’s voters to use their vote to Remain.

Remaining in Europe will continue Oxford’s free access to the world’s largest single market, will allow Oxford citizens to live, work and holiday freely within the 27 other nations, and will demonstrate our solidarity with over 500 million Europeans.

Leaving Europe will be bad for jobs. It will threaten the BMW car plant, the universities and the science jobs at Culham. Remaining in Europe will guarantee rights at work, high environmental standards and a more democratic Europe. 

In summary:

·         Oxford is an international City, with three EU twin towns, and a proud City of Sanctuary. The last census in 2011 showed that 1 in 10 of its resident population were born in EU countries other than UK.

·         The City Council has benefited directly from more than £1m of EU funding and, in May 2015, the City’s Finance Panel took evidence from three of the South East regions MEPs identifying more than seven other potential EU funding streams that the City Council could apply for.

·         Oxford’s economy also benefits enormously from EU tourism (9 out of the top 10 countries of origin are other EU states), from EU funding to its Universities, and other institutions, and from European businesses, such as BMW, that have chosen to operate within the City and County.

·         Workers in Oxford are better off as a result of EU employment directives on equal rights, holidays, pensions, working hours, health and safety and so on.

·         Oxford residents have more opportunities and lower costs when travelling as a result of the EU, free movement, lower mobile phone charges, European health card, educational possibilities and so on.

·         Oxford’s environment has also benefited from EU legislation and guidance on, for example, air quality, recycling and biodiversity.

This Council therefore believes that the case for staying within the EU is overwhelming beneficial for the City and urges those electors eligible to vote to back an ‘IN’ vote at the forthcoming EU Referendum and asks the Leader to write to Oxford’s MPs setting out the Council’s views.

Of course, the EU is not perfect. But neither is Westminster. It needs to be more democratically accountable, transparent and efficient. This Council, however, believes that reform will be easier if the UK remains within the EU.

 

 

2.    Unitary Council proposal (proposed by Councillor Price, seconded by Councillor Tanner)

 

Councillor Price proposed his  ...  view the full minutes text for item 120


Meeting: 08/02/2016 - Council (Item 16)

16 Motions on notice pdf icon PDF 186 KB

This item has a time limit of 60 minutes.

 

The full text of motions received by the Head of Law and Governance in accordance with Council Procedure Rule 11.17 by the deadline of 1.00pm on 1.00pm on 27 January is below. Motions will be taken in turn from the Liberal Democrat, Green, and Labour groups in that order.

 

Substantive amendments to these motions must be sent by councillors to the Head of Law and Governance by no later than 1.00pm on 4 February. The briefing note will list amendments submitted before its publication.

 

Council is asked to consider the following motions:

 

The first motion is a formal all-party motion. The Leader will propose suspending standing orders for the first motion only in order to formally adopt this and then move onto the 60 minutes allotted for the debate of the remaining motions.

 

1.    Fairtrade Mark (proposed by Councillor Price, seconded by Councillors Fooks and Simmons)

 

All-party Labour, Liberal Democrat and Green member motion

 

Oxford City Council, as an important consumer and opinion leader, should continue to support and facilitate the promotion and purchase of foods with the FAIRTRADE Mark as part of its commitment to the pursuit of sustainable development and to give marginalised producers a fair deal.

 

Oxford City Council resolves to continue to contribute to the campaign to increase sales of products with the FAIRTRADE Mark by supporting the campaign to achieve the recertification of FAIRTRADE status for Oxford.

 

To this end, Oxford City Council resolves to ask the Executive to:

 

1. Continue to offer FAIRTRADE Marked food and drink options internally and make them available for internal meetings.

2. Promote the FAIRTRADE Mark using Fairtrade Foundation materials in refreshment areas and promoting the Fairtrade Towns initiative in internal communications and external newsletters.

3. Use its influence to urge local retailers to provide Fairtrade options for residents.

4. Engage in a media campaign to publicise the recertification of Oxford as a Fairtrade Towns initiative.

5. Nominate a Council representative to sit on the Fairtrade Steering Group.

6. Support on-going work to promote Fairtrade.

7. Continue to support organised events and publicity during national Fairtrade Fortnight – the annual national campaign to promote sales of products with the FAIRTRADE Mark

 

2.    Affordable private housing (proposed by Councillor Gant, seconded by Councillor Wade)

 

Liberal Democrat member motion

 

Council notes

 

·         the increasing inability of people on low and middle incomes to be able to afford to buy or rent in or near the city, and that this is hampering the efforts to attract or keep key workers such as nurses, teachers, social workers, junior university staff and other essential employees

 

·         that there are examples of innovative approaches  and solutions to this problem in other parts of the country. Examples include the partnership between Pocket Homes and the Mayor of London and the creative policy of Cambridge City Council to assist the  university to house employees in housing they can afford as the ‘affordable housing’ element of a development

 

·         the work in  ...  view the full agenda text for item 16

Minutes:

Council had before it eight motions on notice and amendments submitted in accordance with Council procedure rule 11.17, and reached decisions as set out below.

 

Council agreed to suspend the standing orders relating to the total time allowed for motions for the first motion only.

 

1.         Fairtrade Mark

Councillor Price proposed a submitted cross-party motion, seconded by Councillor Fooks and supported by Councillor Wolff.

 

On being put to the vote, the motion was declared carried.

 

Council resolved to adopt the motion as set out below:

 

Oxford City Council, as an important consumer and opinion leader, should continue to support and facilitate the promotion and purchase of foods with the FAIRTRADE Mark as part of its commitment to the pursuit of sustainable development and to give marginalised producers a fair deal.

Oxford City Council resolves to continue to contribute to the campaign to increase sales of products with the FAIRTRADE Mark by supporting the campaign to achieve the recertification of FAIRTRADE status for Oxford.

To this end, Oxford City Council resolves to ask the Executive to:

1. Continue to offer FAIRTRADE Marked food and drink options internally and make them available for internal meetings.

2. Promote the FAIRTRADE Mark using Fairtrade Foundation materials in refreshment areas and promoting the Fairtrade Towns initiative in internal communications and external newsletters.

3. Use its influence to urge local retailers to provide Fairtrade options for residents.

4. Engage in a media campaign to publicise the recertification of Oxford as a Fairtrade Towns initiative.

5. Nominate a Council representative to sit on the Fairtrade Steering Group.

6. Support on-going work to promote Fairtrade.

7. Continue to support organised events and publicity during national Fairtrade Fortnight – the annual national campaign to promote sales of products with the FAIRTRADE Mark

 

2.    Affordable private housing

 

Councillor Gant proposed his submitted motion, seconded by Councillor Wade:

 

Council notes

·         the increasing inability of people on low and middle incomes to be able to afford to buy or rent in or near the city, and that this is hampering the efforts to attract or keep key workers such as nurses, teachers, social workers, junior university staff and other essential employees

·         that there are examples of innovative approaches  and solutions to this problem in other parts of the country. Examples include the partnership between Pocket Homes and the Mayor of London and the creative policy of Cambridge City Council to assist the  university to house employees in housing they can afford as the ‘affordable housing’ element of a development

·         the work in hand to consider setting up a Local Housing Company and welcomes the work being done to encourage Oxford University and the Hospital Trust to plan to provide housing for their staff.

Nevertheless, Council considers the need to be so great that, despite uncertainties in future Government policy which may prevent some desirable measures, it is urgent to explore all possible means of addressing the shortfall of essential affordable housing to rent or buy.

Council therefore asks the Executive Board to  ...  view the full minutes text for item 16


Meeting: 07/12/2015 - Council (Item 72)

72 Motions on notice pdf icon PDF 128 KB

This item has a time limit of 60 minutes.

 

The full text of motions received by the Head of Law and Governance in accordance with Council Procedure Rule 11.17 by the deadline of 1.00pm on 25 November is below. Motions will be taken in turn from the Labour Liberal Democrat, Green, groups in that order.

 

Substantive amendments to these motions must be sent by councillors to the Head of Law and Governance by no later than 1.00pm on 3 December. The briefing note will list amendments submitted before its publication.

 

Council is asked to consider the following motions:

 

1.    Housing and Planning Bill (proposed by Councillor Rowley, seconded by Councillor Price)

 

Labour member motion

 

This Council notes:

      that the Housing and Planning Bill is currently being debated in Parliament, and if passed would threaten the provision of affordable homes for rent and buy through forcing "high-value" council homes to be sold on the open market, extending the "right to buy" to housing association tenants, and undermining section 106 requirements on private developers to provide  affordable homes;

      that there is no commitment in the Bill that affordable homes will be replaced   like-for-like in the  local   area - indeed, in Oxford it is very difficult to see how this could work financially;

      that whilst measures to help first-time buyers are welcome, the "starter homes" proposals in the Bill will be unaffordable to families and young people on ordinary incomes in most parts of the country, will not preserve the taxpayer investment, and will be built at the expense of genuinely affordable homes to rent and buy;

      that the Bill undermines localism by taking yet more new wide and open-ended powers for the Whitehall over councils and local communities - including the ability to override local plans, to mandate rents for social tenants, and to impose a levy on stock-holding councils, violating the terms of the housing revenue account self-financing deal; and

      that the Bill, whilst introducing some welcome measures to get to grips with rogue landlords, does not help with the high rents, poor conditions and insecurity affecting many  private renters, in an expanding sector which now houses more than one in four households in Oxford, and does nothing to help arrest the recent rise in homelessness.

 

This Council:

      congratulates those involved in the Council's statistical research, which presents a clear picture of Oxford to the public and greatly helps us as Members to argue the case for Oxford; and

      thanks officers for the work they have done in preparing a robust response to the Government's consultation on the Bill.

 

This Council therefore resolves to ask the Executive Board:

1.     to analyse and report on the likely impact of the forced sale of council homes, the extension of right-to-buy and the "starter homes" requirement on the local availability of affordable homes, and any further impacts of the Bill on our City;

2.     to support the Leader of the Council in writing to the Secretary  ...  view the full agenda text for item 72

Minutes:

Council had before it six motions on notice and amendments submitted in accordance with Council procedure rule 11.17, and reached decisions as set out below.

 

1.    Housing and Planning Bill

 

Councillor Rowley proposed his submitted motion, seconded by Councillor Price.

 

After debate and on being put to the vote the motion was declared carried.

 

Council resolved to adopt the motion set out below:

 

This Council notes:

      that the Housing and Planning Bill is currently being debated in Parliament, and if passed would threaten the provision of affordable homes for rent and buy through forcing "high-value" council homes to be sold on the open market, extending the "right to buy" to housing association tenants, and undermining section 106 requirements on private developers to provide  affordable homes;

      that there is no commitment in the Bill that affordable homes will be replaced like-for-like in the local area - indeed, in Oxford it is very difficult to see how this could work financially;

      that whilst measures to help first-time buyers are welcome, the "starter homes" proposals in the Bill will be unaffordable to families and young people on ordinary incomes in most parts of the country, will not preserve the taxpayer investment, and will be built at the expense of genuinely affordable homes to rent and buy;

      that the Bill undermines localism by taking yet more new wide and open-ended powers for the Whitehall over councils and local communities - including the ability to override local plans, to mandate rents for social tenants, and to impose a levy on stock-holding councils, violating the terms of the housing revenue account self-financing deal; and

      that the Bill, whilst introducing some welcome measures to get to grips with rogue landlords, does not help with the high rents, poor conditions and insecurity affecting many  private renters, in an expanding sector which now houses more than one in four households in Oxford, and does nothing to help arrest the recent rise in homelessness.

 

This Council:

      congratulates those involved in the Council's statistical research, which presents a clear picture of Oxford to the public and greatly helps us as Members to argue the case for Oxford; and

      thanks officers for the work they have done in preparing a robust response to the Government's consultation on the Bill.

 

This Council therefore resolves to ask the Executive Board:

1.    to analyse and report on the likely impact of the forced sale of council homes, the extension of right-to-buy and the "starter homes" requirement on the local availability of affordable homes, and any further impacts of the Bill on our City;

2.    to support the Leader of the Council in writing to the Secretary of State with our concerns about the Bill;

3.    to ask for urgent meetings for the Leader of the Council, the Chief Executive and relevant Board Members and Officers, with our two local MPs, and with the relevant Minister in the DCLG; and

4.    to make public our concerns by publishing this  ...  view the full minutes text for item 72


Meeting: 23/09/2015 - Council (Item 50)

50 Motions on notice pdf icon PDF 126 KB

Motions received in accordance with Council Procedure Rule 11.17.

 

Motions received by the Head of Law and Governance by the deadline of 1.00pm on 11 September 2015, as amended by the proposers, are below.

 

Substantive amendments to these motions must be sent by councillors to the Head of Law and Governance by no later than 1.00pm on 21 September 2015. Full details of the text and any substantive amendments submitted before publication will be included in the agenda briefing note.

 

Motions will be taken in turn from the Green, Labour and Liberal Democrat groups in that order.

 

 

1.    Oxford as a City of Sanctuary (proposed by Cllr Simmons)

 

Green member motion

 

On 6 October 2008, the Council passed a motion declaring itself to be a City of Sanctuary with the words that “this Council wishes to promote the inclusion and welfare of those coming to Oxford to seek refuge and sanctuary.”

 

We recognise the strong support local communities, voluntary bodies, faith groups and others in Oxford already give to those seeking refuge and sanctuary. The strength of public feeling was well expressed in the ‘Oxford Welcomes Refugees’ March on 6 September that attracted more than 2,000 people.

 

The UN refugee agency has asked EU Member States to immediately take 200,000 additional refugees to lessen the humanitarian crisis. In response, the EU has adopted a quota system which the UK Government has refused to participate in. Rather than the 25,000 that would represent it’s ‘fair share’ of migrants (spreading this across the country would mean about 60 refugees being accommodated in a City the size of Oxford), the Prime Minister has instead announced that his Government would make provision for only 4,000 each year.

 

Recognising its role and responsibility as a City of Sanctuary, this Council asks the Executive to:

·           work with the City of Sanctuary, Asylum Welcome, Refugee Resource and other local groups to develop a plan that would see upwards of 60 refugees being housed within the City through schemes such as ‘Host Oxford’

·           consider what support can be given to donation efforts, such as those by Emmaus, providing supplies to refugees in Calais

·           review its own budgets, services and policies to check that these are adequately supporting refugees and present no impediment to the accommodation in private homes of refugees

·           apply for Government funding under the Syrian Vulnerable Person Relocation (SVPR) scheme to help support its efforts

·           write to the City’s Universities encouraging them to consider extending their funded studentships to include more places specifically for refugees

·           write to the City’s MPs expressing concern over the UK Government’s weak response to the refugee crisis and asking them to lobby for the UK to welcome it’s fair share of refugees

 

2.    Air quality and cleaner city (proposed by Cllr Fooks)

 

Liberal Democrat member motion

 

Council notes the recent reports that suggest that the health impact of excessive NOx and particulate emissions has been seriously underestimated. Recent research by the Committee on the Medical Effects of Air Pollutants  ...  view the full agenda text for item 50

Minutes:

Council had before it four motions on notice and amendments submitted in accordance with Council procedure rule 11.17 and reached decisions as set out below.

 

1.   Oxford as a City of Sanctuary

 

Councillor Simmons proposed his submitted motion, accepting the amendment proposed by Councillor Price. Councillor Price seconded the motion as amended.

 

After debate and on being put to the vote, the motion was declared carried with all councillors voting in support

 

Council resolved to adopt the motion set out below:

 

Oxford has a long tradition of welcoming immigrants and refugees from around the world. The cultural richness of the city is fundamental to its creativity, the excellence of our health services and the global reputation of our universities. Oxford is a truly global city, with one in three of our residents born overseas. 8000 students from 139 countries outside the UK are represented in the University of Oxford. Increasing numbers of refugees are fleeing bloody conflicts and oppressive regimes, deepening the global humanitarian crisis that has been developing over the last decade. Some of the most vulnerable people in the world are dying as they try to reach safety. The City Council welcomes the huge level of support shown by the Oxford and Oxfordshire communities for a local response to this crisis.

 

On 6 October 2008, the Council passed a motion declaring itself to be a City of Sanctuary with the words that “this Council wishes to promote the inclusion and welfare of those coming to Oxford to seek refuge and sanctuary.”

 

We recognise the strong support local communities, voluntary bodies, faith groups and others in Oxford already give to those seeking refuge and sanctuary. The strength of public feeling was well expressed in the ‘Oxford Welcomes Refugees’ March on 6 September that attracted more than 2,000 people.

 

The UN refugee agency has asked EU Member States to immediately take 200,000 additional refugees to lessen the humanitarian crisis. In response, the EU has adopted a quota system which the UK Government has refused to participate in.

 

Rather than the 18,000 that would represent the UK’s share of refugees, the Prime Minister has announced that his government would make provision for 20,000 over the course of this Parliament. This would simply be an extension of the existing UNHCR scheme for resettlement of vulnerable people (with a strong emphasis on young people) from the camps in the Lebanon and Jordan. This fails entirely to deal with the refugees who have fled the war and the camps and have already reached an EU country in order to find safety and refuge.

 

Recognising the humanitarian crisis that has unfolded in recent months and our moral responsibility to respond to it, this Council asks the Executive to:

 

  1. Continue to coordinate the work of local charities, voluntary bodies and the public authorities in the Oxford area to ensure that there are effective procedures in place to welcome refugees of all ages and to offer appropriate housing and support.
  2. Continue to encourage people in Oxford and  ...  view the full minutes text for item 50

Meeting: 20/07/2015 - Council (Item 31)

31 Motions on Notice pdf icon PDF 53 KB

Motions received in accordance with Council Procedure Rule 11.16.

 

The full text of motions received by the Head of Law and Governance by the deadline of 1.00pm on 8 July, and as amended by the proposer, is attached to this agenda.

 

Substantive amendments to these motions must be received by the Head of Law and Governance by no later than 1.00pm on 16 July.

 

Full details of motions submitted by the deadline are attached and the briefing note will contain any substantive amendments submitted before its publication.

 

Motions will be taken in turn from the Liberal Democrat, Green, and Labour groups in that order.

1.    Provision of key worker housing (proposed by Cllr Wade seconded by Cllr Gotch)

Liberal Democrat member motion


This Council welcomes the progress of the Barton Park development but notes that there is no provision for key worker housing on this estate.

This Council believes that key workers are vital to the continuing success of this City, and in particular consider that the lack of key worker housing for teaching professionals has contributed to the poor results in City schools.

This Council asks the Executive Board to request a report from officers (a) suggesting the categories of workers who should be eligible for key worker housing, and (b) recommending how quality housing should be provided specifically for key workers in our City.

2.    Government austerity cuts (proposed by Cllr Hollick seconded by Cllr Thomas)

Green member motion

 

This Council is deeply concerned at the benefit, and other funding, cuts announced by the Government on 8th July and the likely hardship that this will cause to the residents of Oxford, in particular those in housing need.

 

We therefore ask CEB to look carefully at this year’s £4m underspend with a view to formulating a mid-year ‘emergency budget’ aimed at mitigating the impact of these cuts on the most vulnerable.

                  

We also ask the Leader to write to the Ministers responsible expressing our serious concern at the austerity cuts and their effect on Local Government and the City’s most vulnerable people.

 

3.    Encouraging collaboration for action on cancer (proposed by Cllr Coulter)

Labour member motion

 

Oxford City Council congratulates each of the organisations meeting together at Oxford Town Hall on 4 February to mark "World Cancer Day". Council thanks each of those organisations for providing advocacy, for highlighting the suffering caused by cancer, and for providing hope through the development of innovative treatments and supportive care - all of which is centred on improving outcomes for patients, their families and their carers.

 

Each year, 8.2 million die worldwide from cancer. Four million die prematurely. And, one out of every two of us will experience painful illness through cancer.

 

Oxford has a significant role in medical science and in cancer research, with 450 post-doctoral researchers working on cancer related investigations - bringing £22 million to our local economy and with the likelihood such work will expand, for example, with the Churchill Hospital's recognition as a lead centre  ...  view the full agenda text for item 31

Minutes:

Council had before it seven motions on notice and amendments submitted in accordance with Council procedure rule 11.17, and reached decisions as set out below.

 

1.   Provision of key worker housing

 

Councillor Wade proposed her submitted motion, seconded by Councillor Gotch.

 

This Council welcomes the progress of the Barton Park development but notes that there is no provision for key worker housing on this estate.

This Council believes that key workers are vital to the continuing success of this City, and in particular consider that the lack of key worker housing for teaching professionals has contributed to the poor results in City schools.

This Council asks the Executive Board to request a report from officers (a) suggesting the categories of workers who should be eligible for key worker housing, and (b) recommending how quality housing should be provided specifically for key workers in our City.

 

Councillor Wade accepted a minor amendment proposed by Councillor Hollingsworth and circulated at the meeting:

to amend the last sentence to read This Council notes that the Executive Board has already requested a report from officers (a)……’ and this was accepted by Council.

 

Councillor Hollick proposed an amendment, seconded by Councillor Turner: to add to end of motion “without impacting on the level of social housing provision.

 

On being put to the vote, the amendment was declared carried.

 

On being put to the vote, the motion as amended was declared carried.

 

Council agreed to adopt the motion as set out below:

 

This Council welcomes the progress of the Barton Park development but notes that there is no provision for key worker housing on this estate.

 

This Council believes that key workers are vital to the continuing success of this City, and in particular consider that the lack of key worker housing for teaching professionals has contributed to the poor results in City schools.

 

This Council notes that the Executive Board has already requested a report from officers (a) suggesting the categories of workers who should be eligible for key worker housing, and (b) recommending how quality housing should be provided specifically for key workers in our City without impacting on the level of social housing provision.

 

2.   Government austerity cuts

 

Councillor Hollick proposed his submitted motion, seconded by Councillor Thomas.

 

This Council is deeply concerned at the benefit, and other funding, cuts announced by the Government on 8th July and the likely hardship that this will cause to the residents of Oxford, in particular those in housing need.

 

We therefore ask CEB to look carefully at this year’s £4m underspend with a view to formulating a mid-year ‘emergency budget’ aimed at mitigating the impact of these cuts on the most vulnerable.

 

We also ask the Leader to write to the Ministers responsible expressing our serious concern at the austerity cuts and their effect on Local Government and the City’s most vulnerable people.

 

Councillor Turner proposed and Councillor Fooks seconded an amendment: to delete the middle paragraph and replace with

We therefore  ...  view the full minutes text for item 31