Agenda and minutes

Agenda and minutes

Speaking at a Council or Committee meeting

Venue: Council Chamber - Oxford Town Hall. View directions

Contact: Jennifer Thompson, Committee and Members Services Officer  email:  democraticservices@oxford.gov.uk tel: 01865 252275

Items
No. Item

69.

Declarations of interest

Minutes:

There were no declarations.

 

70.

Minutes pdf icon PDF 149 KB

Minutes of the ordinary meeting of Council held on 27 November 2017.

Council is asked to approve the minutes as a correct record.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Council approved the minutes of the special meeting of 27 November 2017 as a correct record.

 

Council approved the minutes of the ordinary meeting of 27 November 2017 as a correct record with the addition of the text of the petition to Minute 65.

71.

Appointment to Committees

There have been no notifications of changes of membership to committees.

Any changes notified after publication of the agenda will be circulated with the briefing note.

Minutes:

Councillor Price proposed and Council agreed to appoint Councillor Lygo to replace Councillor Tidball on West Area Planning Committee.

 

Councillor Gant proposed and Council agreed to appoint Councillor Wade to replace Councillor Landell Mills on West Area Planning Committee.

72.

Announcements

Announcements by:

1.    The Lord Mayor

2.    The Sheriff

3.    The Leader of the Council (who may with the permission of the Lord Mayor invite other councillors to make announcements)

4.    The Chief Executive, Chief Finance Officer, Monitoring Officer

Minutes:

The Lord Mayor:

·         reported on the Holocaust Remembrance Service on 26 January;

·         reported on the ceremony to present Bill Heine with a Special Certificate of Merit by Oxford City Council in recognition of his contribution to the city;

·         announced that Rev Bannister Parker, currently at University Church of St Mary the Virgin, had been appointed as interim City Rector and looked forward to welcoming her at future meetings of the Council.

 

The Sheriff made no announcements.

 

The Leader of the Council, Councillor Price announced that the civic office holders for 2018/19, subject to election at Annual Council, would be:

 

Lord Mayor                            Councillor Cook

Deputy Lord Mayor              Councillor Malik

Sheriff                                                Councillor Simmons

 

73.

Appointment of Council Leader

The Leader of the Council has notified the Proper Officer that he is resigning as Executive Leader at this meeting of full Council.

 

Council is asked to elect a new Executive Leader for a term of office starting immediately and ending at the annual meeting of council immediately following the local election when he or she is due for re-election as a councillor.

 

Minutes:

Further to Councillor Price having announced his resignation as Leader of the Council effective from 29 January 2017 to the Chief Executive, Council was asked to elect an Executive Leader of Council.

 

The Executive Leader of Council was elected for a term of office starting immediately, and ending at the annual meeting of Council immediately following the local election when she is due for re-election as a councillor

 

Councillor Brown, being proposed and seconded for the role, was elected as the Council’s Executive Leader with a term of office to end at the annual meeting on 15 May 2018.

 

Councillor Brown thanked Council and announced

·         Councillor Smith was appointed as the Deputy Leader of Council;

·         Councillor Price remained on the Executive with responsibility for his current portfolio including Human Resources but excluding the corporate plan, and would also remain the Executive’s representative on the Growth Board;

·         She would retain responsibility for her current Executive portfolio excluding Human Resources but including the corporate plan.

·         No other changes were proposed immediately.

 

Councillor Brown thanked Councillor Price for his 12 years of service as Leader, and the Lord Mayor and leaders of the opposition groups also paid tribute to him as a loyal, hard-working and straight-talking Leader steering the Council through challenging times and maintaining its commitment to public service. Councillors thanked Councillor Price for his service as Leader.

 

Councillor Price thanked councillors and officers for their collective contribution to the work of the Council and congratulated Councillor Brown on her appointment.

 

Councillor Brown took the role of Leader from this point in the meeting.

 

74.

Public addresses and questions that relate to matters for decision at this meeting

Public addresses and questions to the Leader or other Board member received in accordance with Council Procedure Rules 11.11, 11.12, and 11.13 relating to matters for decision in Part 1 of this agenda.

The request to speak accompanied by the full text of the address or question must be received by the Head of Law and Governance by 5.00 pm on Tuesday 23 January 2018.

The briefing note will contain the text of addresses and questions submitted by the deadline, and written responses where available.

A total of 45 minutes is available for both public speaking items. Responses are included in this time. Up to five minutes is available for each public address and up to three minutes for each question.

Minutes:

There were no addresses or questions.

75.

Council Tax Reduction Scheme for 2018/19 pdf icon PDF 145 KB

The Executive Director Organisational Development & Corporate Services submitted a report to the City Executive Board on 20 December 2017 consider the feedback from the recent consultation on the proposed changes to the Local Council Tax Support Scheme and to agree the principles of the new scheme to be drawn up for approval by Council on 29 January 2018.

The City Executive Board agreed to

1.    Note the outcome of the consultation on the proposed Council Tax Reduction Scheme.

2.    Instruct the Executive Director Organisational Development & Corporate Services  to draft the details of the new Council Tax Reduction Scheme for 2018/19, including provision for uprating the proposed income band scheme, and submit the new Local Council Tax Support Scheme to Council for approval at its meeting on the 29 January 2018;

3.    Recommend Council to resolve to adopt the new Local Council Tax Reduction Scheme.

The full draft scheme is available as a background paper to this report.

 

Councillor Brown, Board Member for Customer and Corporate Services, will move the recommendations.

 

Recommendation: the City Executive Board recommends Council to resolve to

adopt a Council Tax reduction scheme for 2018/19 comprising that in place as at 1 April 2017 with changes as set out in the options in the report to:

1.    Create an income band scheme for Universal Credit  customers

2.    Remove second adult reduction provision

3.    Limit backdating to one month

4.    Introduce a minimum income floor for self-employed claims

5.     Reduce period where someone can claim whilst abroad

6.    Remove family premium for new claims

 

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Councillor Tanner arrived for the start of this item.

Council considered a report from the Executive Director Organisational Development & Corporate Services to the City Executive Board on 20 December 2017 asking the Board to consider the feedback from the recent consultation on the proposed changes to the Local Council Tax Support Scheme and to agree the principles of the new scheme to be drawn up for approval by Council.

The full draft scheme was also available to Council.

Councillor Brown, Leader of the Council, presented the report and moved the recommendations which were adopted on being seconded and put to the vote.

 

Council resolved to:

adopt the Council Tax reduction scheme for 2018/19 comprising that in place as at 1 April 2017 with changes as set out in the options in the report to:

1.    Create an income band scheme for Universal Credit  customers

2.    Remove second adult reduction provision

3.    Limit backdating to one month

4.    Introduce a minimum income floor for self-employed claims

5.     Reduce period where someone can claim whilst abroad

6.    Remove family premium for new claims.

76.

Housing and Homelessness Strategy 2018-2021 pdf icon PDF 113 KB

The Head of Housing Services submitted a report to the City Executive Board on 23 January 2018 which notes the amendments made to the draft Housing and Homelessness Strategy 2018-21 following 6 weeks of public consultation and seeks the City Executive Board’s approval of the amended draft Strategy (and its associated appendices).

The City Executive Board is asked to

1.    Note the amendments made to the draft Housing and Homelessness Strategy 2018-21 in response to feedback from the public consultation; and

2.    Adopt the amended draft Housing and Homelessness Strategy 2018-21 and its associated appendices.

In addition the City Executive Board will be asked to recommend that Council adopt the strategy and authorise the Head of Housing Services to make appropriate amendments.

 

Councillor Rowley, Board Member for Housing, will move the recommendations.

 

Recommendation: subject to the decision of the City Executive Board on 23 January, Council is recommended to resolve to

1.    Adopt the amended draft Housing and Homelessness Strategy 2018-21 and its associated appendices.

2.    Delegate authority to the Head of Housing Services to make minor editorial changes as recommended by the Housing Panel of the Scrutiny Committee at its meeting on 16 January and by the City Executive Board at its meeting on 23 January, and to update the Strategy and Action Plan as required in accordance with the monitoring and review process set out in Chapter 10 of the Strategy

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Councillor Goddard arrived for the start of this item.

Council considered a report from the Head of Housing Services to the City Executive Board on 23 January 2018 which noted the amendments made to the draft Housing and Homelessness Strategy 2018-21 following 6 weeks of public consultation and sought the City Executive Board’s approval of the amended draft Strategy (and its associated appendices) and recommend its approval to Council.

Councillor Rowley, Board Member for Housing, presented the report and moved the recommendations which were adopted on being seconded and put to the vote.

 

Council resolved to:

1.    adopt the amended draft Housing and Homelessness Strategy 2018-21 and its associated appendices.

2.    delegate authority to the Head of Housing Services to make minor editorial changes as recommended by the Housing Panel of the Scrutiny Committee at its meeting on 16 January and by the City Executive Board at its meeting on 23 January, and to update the Strategy and Action Plan as required in accordance with the monitoring and review process set out in Chapter 10 of the Strategy

77.

Council and Committee meetings programme May 2018-May 2019 pdf icon PDF 105 KB

The Head of Law and Goverance has submitted a report setting out a programme of Council, Committee and other meetings for the 2018/19 council year (May 2018 to May 2019 inclusive)

 

Councillor Price, Board Member for Corporate Strategy and Economic Development, will move the recommendations.

 

Recommendations: that Council resolves to

1.    approve the programme of Council, Committee and other meetings attached at Appendix 1 for the council year 2018/19; and

2.    delegate the setting of dates for the Standards Committee and training and briefing sessions for members to the Committee and Members Services Manager.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Council considered the report of the Head of Law and Governance setting out a programme of Council, Committee and other meetings for the 2018/19 council year (May 2018 to May 2019 inclusive).

Councillor Price, Board Member for Corporate Strategy and Economic Development, presented the report and moved the recommendations which were adopted on being seconded and put to the vote.

 

Council resolved to:

1.    approve the programme of Council, Committee and other meetings attached at Appendix 1 for the council year 2018/19; and

2.    delegate the setting of dates for the Standards Committee and training and briefing sessions for members to the Committee and Members Services Manager.

78.

City Executive Board Minutes

This item has a time limit of 15 minutes.

Councillors may ask the Board Members questions about matters in these minutes:

78a

Minutes of meeting Tuesday 21 November 2017 of City Executive Board pdf icon PDF 140 KB

Minutes:

Minute 101 Review of the Community Grants programme

Councillor Gant asked about progress on resolution 6 (early discussions with advice centres about the new arrangements for their funding).

Councillor Brown replied that a number of meetings with the centres were scheduled or had happened. Officers were working on the implementation of the new programme and would meet again with advice centres to discuss their proposals.

 

78b

Minutes of meeting Monday 27 November 2017 of City Executive Board pdf icon PDF 101 KB

Minutes:

There were no questions on these minutes.

78c

Minutes of meeting Wednesday 20 December 2017 of City Executive Board pdf icon PDF 132 KB

Minutes:

There were no questions on these minutes.

 

78d

Minutes of meeting Tuesday 23 January 2018 of City Executive Board (to follow) pdf icon PDF 121 KB

Minutes:

Minute 136: Scrutiny Committee reports: Preventing Elderly Isolation

Councillor Wilkinson said this had been raised at the Headington Forum and asked what actions by Oxfordshire Strategic Partnership were envisaged.

Councillor Price replied that the partnership was organising around thematic task-and-finish groups, and isolation was one proposed strand. The Headington Forum could contact him if it wished to be involved in the task-and finish group.

 

 

Minute 137: Community Infrastructure Levy - Preliminary Draft Charging Schedule

Councillor Goddard asked if a list of large projects and liability for CIL or S106 payments or both could be made available. Councillor Hollingsworth said that it could.

 

Minute 141: Lucy Faithfull House

Councillor Thomas asked why the proposal was not for 100% affordable units on the site.

Councillor Rowley said the proposal was for the maximum number of genuinely affordable units that could realistically be financed.

79.

Questions on Notice from Members of Council

Questions on notice from councillors received in accordance with Council Procedure Rule 11.10(b).

Questions on notice may be asked of the Lord Mayor, a Member of the City Executive Board or a Chair of a Committee. One supplementary question may be asked at the meeting.

The full text of questions must be received by the Head of Law and Governance by no later than 1.00pm on Monday 22 January 2018.

The briefing note will contain all questions submitted by the deadline, and written responses where available.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

36 written questions on notice were submitted. These, written responses, and 26 supplementary questions and responses are set out in the supplement to these minutes.

 

 

80.

Public addresses and questions that do not relate to matters for decision at this Council meeting

Public addresses and questions to the Leader or other Board member received in accordance with Council Procedure Rule 11.11, 11.12 and 11.13 and not related to matters for decision in Part 1 of this agenda.

The request to speak accompanied by the full text of the address or question must be received by the Head of Law and Governance by 5.00 pm on Tuesday 23 January 2018.

The briefing note will contain the text of addresses and questions submitted by the deadline, and written responses where available.

A total of 45 minutes is available for both public speaking items. Responses are included in this time. Up to five minutes is available for each public address and up to three minutes for each question.

 

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Two speakers addressed Council.

 

1.    Judith Harley addressed Council asking it to recognise, and begin to tackle, the racism, neglect, and lack of opportunity for those of African Caribbean heritage in this City today, both within, and outside, the Council.

2.    Stefan Piechnik on behalf of James Lawson asked a question about whether he paid for the refurbishment work to the tower blocks and if so why there was no response to his concerns.

 

The full text of these speeches and question where these were read as submitted; responses from the Board Members in writing before the meeting; and summaries of verbal responses given at the meeting are in the supplement to these minutes.

 

81.

Petition submitted in accordance with Council procedure rules - Westgate bike racks pdf icon PDF 129 KB

This item has a 15 minute time limit in total.

The head petitioner or their representative may speak to Council for a maximum of 5 minutes at the start of this item.

Council is asked to consider a petition meeting the criteria for debate under the Council’s petitions scheme in line with the procedure for large petitions.

The full text of the petition is contained in the accompanying report of the Head of Law and Governance.

If a Councillor wishes to propose a substantive motion in respect of the petition then they must submit this by 10.00am on the working day before the full Council meeting (Friday 26 January). These are then published in the Council briefing note. Any amendments to these must be submitted by 11.00am on the day of the meeting.

If no substantive motion is agreed, Council is asked to note the petition.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Council considered a petition meeting the criteria for debate under the Council’s petitions scheme in line with the procedure for large petitions stating:

Where are our promised 1000 Westgate bike racks?

One of the planning conditions attached to the development of the Westgate Shopping Centre was the provision of 1022 bike parking spaces. These bike racks were intended to replace those removed from the City Centre during the construction works and provide additional spaces to encourage more sustainable travel.

So far, Labour-run Oxford City Council (who voted through the development on their own land) have failed to enforce this condition, allowing the Westgate to open with only a small fraction of the promised cycle parking and without the promised cycle hub. Overall, Oxford now has far fewer cycle racks than before the Westgate development began.

The Council have, however, found time to expand the number of car parking places in the City Centre and negotiated a reduction in car parking fees leading to increased traffic and a worsening of Oxford's already badly polluted air.

 

Elise Benjamin, the petition organiser, addressed Council.

 

Council considered two motions relating to the petition set out in the briefing note.

 

On being proposed, seconded and put to the vote, the motion proposed by Councillor Simmons was not agreed.

 

On being proposed, seconded and put to the vote, Council resolved to agree the motion proposed by Councillor Upton:

 

Council notes the petition and while it is a matter of regret that not all of the public realm works, and therefore some on-street cycle parking, around the Westgate Centre were completed before the opening of the first shops the Council is pleased that the Westgate Centre have identified locations for the installation of more cycle parking spaces than was required by the planning condition. As the final paving works around the site are completed, any outstanding cycle parking spaces will be installed.

 

Oxford City Council believes that increased space for secure cycle parking, both in the city centre and in residential streets, is essential for getting more people moving round the city by bike. This will have huge benefits in terms of both increasing physical activity levels and better health and reducing pollution and congestion.

 

In addition, we support the introduction of segregated cycle lanes along all of the “Cycling Super and Premium Routes” proposed in Oxfordshire County Council’s Local Transport Plan 4. And the City Council’s new Local Plan should include policies to support safe segregated cycle routes across our parks, and an increased priority cycle parking across the city.

 

Our goal is to have a joined up network of safe cycle routes so that both confident and the less confident can all get on their bikes, trikes and scooters and make their journeys in safety and comfort, and know that there are secure places to park their bike at the end of those journeys. We want Oxford to be a great cycling city for all.

 

82.

Outside organisation/Committee Chair reports and questions - Oxfordshire Partnerships report pdf icon PDF 132 KB

1.    On behalf of Councillor Price, the Assistant Chief Executive has submitted the annual Oxfordshire Partnership update Report from Oxfordshire County Council and her covering report.

Council is invited to comment on and note the submitted report.

 

2.    Each ordinary meeting of Council shall normally receive a written report concerning the work of one of the partnerships on which the Council is represented.

The programme of reporting at future meetings will be:

23 April 2018

Oxfordshire Growth Board and Oxfordshire Local Economic Partnership

 

Oxfordshire Health and Wellbeing Board

 

3.    As set out in procedure rule 11.15, Members who are Council representatives on external bodies or Chairs of Council Committees who consider that a significant decision or event has taken place, may give notice to the Head of Law and Governance by 1.00 pm on Thursday 25 January 2018 that they will present a written or oral report on the event or the significant decision and how it may influence future events. Written reports will be circulated with the briefing note.

 

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Councillor Price introduced the annual Oxfordshire Partnership Update Report from Oxfordshire County Council and the covering report. He recommended  that in future the covering report  should set out how the partnerships impacted on the work of the Council

 

Council resolved to note the report.

83.

Scrutiny Committee update report pdf icon PDF 116 KB

The Chair of the Scrutiny Committee has submitted a report which updates Council on the activities of scrutiny and other non-executive Councillors and the implementation of recommendations since the last meeting of Council.

Council is invited to comment on and note the report.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Councillor Turner arrived during this item.

 

Council had before it the report of the Scrutiny Committee.

 

Councillor Gant introduced the report. Councillor Rowley thanked the Housing Panel for their work on the Housing Strategy and suggested that the Panel may wish to co-opt a representative from the new homelessness partnership in due course.

 

Council resolved to note the report and recommendations accepted.

 

84.

Motions on notice pdf icon PDF 174 KB

This item has a time limit of 60 minutes.

The full text of motions received by the Head of Law and Governance in accordance with Council Procedure Rule 11.17 by the deadline of 1.00pm on Wednesday 17 January 2018 is below. Motions will be taken in turn from Green, Labour and Liberal Democrat groups in that order.

Substantive amendments to these motions must be sent by councillors to the Head of Law and Governance by no later than 10.00am on Friday 26 January 2018 so that they may be circulated with the briefing note.

Minor technical or limited wording amendments may be submitted during the meeting but must be written down and circulated.

Council is asked to consider the following motions:

a.     Setting a target of zero rough sleeping in Oxford (proposed by Councillor Thomas, seconded by Councillor Simmons)

b.     Public services must be run for the public benefit, not private profit (proposed by Councillor Iley-Williamson)       

c.      Fair employment: voluntary charter “Dying to Work” (proposed by Councillor Wilkinson)

d.     Opposing expansion of Oxford Airport and proposed Oxford-Cambridge Expressway road (proposed by Councillor Wolff, seconded by Councillor Simmons)

e.     Sexual Harassment at Work (proposed by Councillor Smith, seconded by Councillor Pressel)

f.       Phasing out unnecessary single-use plastics (proposed by Councillor Brandt, seconded by Councillor Simmons)

g.     Call on Government to introduce a new Clean Air Act (proposed by Councillor Wolff, seconded by Councillor Simmons)  

Minutes:

Council had before it nine motions on notice and amendments submitted in accordance with Council procedure rule 11.17 and published with the agenda and briefing note, and reached decisions as set out below.

 

Council resolved to adopt the following motions as set out in these minutes:

a.     Setting a target of zero rough sleeping in Oxford as amended

b.     Public services must be run for the public benefit, not private profit

c.      Fair employment: voluntary charter “Dying to Work”

 

The following were not taken because the time for discussing motions had elapsed.

d.     Opposing expansion of Oxford Airport and proposed Oxford-Cambridge Expressway road

e.     Sexual Harassment at Work

f.       Phasing out unnecessary single-use plastics

Call on Government to introduce a new Clean Air Act            

84a

Setting a target of zero rough sleeping in Oxford

Proposed by Councillor Thomas, seconded by Councillor Simmons

Green member motion

This Council has adopted many aspirational targets to demonstrate its long-term commitment to continuous improvement and desire to be recognised as “a world-class city”.  For example, it has committed itself to zero waste to landfill, reducing carbon emissions to zero through compliance with the Paris Agreement and, most recently, to explore   the introduction of a City Centre zero emissions zone.

These targets are challenging, will be difficult to achieve and will inevitably require new policies to be developed, new investment and a nationally favourable legislative framework. Nonetheless, they provide a clear direction of travel, demonstrate leadership and a clear statement of a measurable endpoint.

This Council believes that to help frame the ‘big conversation’ around the Council’s homelessness strategy refresh a similar bold commitment is required.

This Council therefore agrees to adopt a target of zero rough sleeping on the streets of Oxford [1].

 

Note: As with other such commitments, this target will need to be further defined and refined, timings developed, and a work programme agreed as part of the strategy refresh.

[1] This target would preclude those who voluntarily elect to sleep rough.

 

Minutes:

Councillor Thomas proposed his submitted motion as set out in the agenda and briefing note, and accepted the amendment set out in the briefing note proposed by Councillor Rowley.

 

Councillor Simmons seconded the amended motion.

 

Councillor Wade, seconded by Councillor Gant, proposed an amended version of her submitted amendment:

To retain the section:

 

This Council therefore agrees to …… target of zero rough sleeping on the streets of Oxford ……… and in pursuit of that target will:

1.         Explore flexible options to accommodate or support the homeless

2.         Call for a national strategy to support those who fall outside the safety net of ‘local connection’.

3.         Draw up a list of minimum requirements to meet the needs of rough sleepers e.g. showers, storage facilities, provision of clothing.

4.         Ensure adequate sleeping accommodation to include the winter months as well as ‘severe weather’ provision.

5.         Establish criteria upon which, in an extreme situation, a Community Protection Notice could be issued. This to require written authorisation by the Legal Department and by the Head of Service.

 

noting that as with other such commitments, this target will need to be further defined and refined, timings developed, and a work programme agreed as part of the strategy refresh.

 

After debate and on being put to the vote, the amendment above was agreed.

 

After debate and on being put to the vote, the amended motion as set out below was agreed.

 

Council resolved to adopt the following motion, as proposed and including the amendments agreed as set out in the briefing note and above:

 

This Council has adopted many aspirational social and environmental targets to demonstrate its long-term commitment to continuous improvement and a desire to be recognised as "a world-class city".

 

Meeting these targets is a challenge, requiring new policies to be developed, new investments to be made and a nationally favourable legislative framework to be in place.

 

Nonetheless, they provide a clear direction of travel, demonstrate leadership and a clear statement of a measurable endpoint.

 

This Council believes that to help frame the ‘big conversation’ around the Council’s homelessness strategy refresh a similar bold commitment is required concerning rough sleeping.

 

The Housing and Homelessness Strategy sets the objective of "preventing and ending rough sleeping", and at last November's City Conversation we made a joint commitment with our partners to the principle that "no-one should be forced to sleep rough on the streets of Oxford."

 

This Council therefore agrees to formally reaffirm its target of zero rough sleeping on the streets of Oxford, excluding those who voluntarily elect to sleep rough

 

and in pursuit of that target will:

1.            Explore flexible options to accommodate or support the homeless

2.            Call for a national strategy to support those who fall outside the safety net of ‘local connection’.

3.            Draw up a list of minimum requirements to meet the needs of rough sleepers e.g. showers, storage facilities, provision of clothing.

4.            Ensure adequate sleeping accommodation to include the winter months as well as ‘severe  ...  view the full minutes text for item 84a

84b

Public services must be run for the public benefit, not private profit

Proposed by Councillor Iley-Williamson

Labour member motion

 

The collapse of Carillion has left their workforce fearful of their jobs, wages, and pensions. It has also left the provision of vital services on the brink, with the absurdity of firefighters in Oxfordshire having to be on standby to ensure schoolchildren are fed.

It follows recent press reports of Oxfordshire County Council, South Oxfordshire Council, and the Vale of White Horse Council pulling out of outsourcing deals because of poor service delivery.

Another recent case of the dangers of outsourcing is that of Capita, which provides outsourced services in many parts of local government. It has recently announced that it will be closing its defined benefit pension scheme in its Life and Pensions Regulated Services division. This will substantially reduce its employees' expected pensions. 

This Council believes that any organisations which provide services on behalf of the council should reflect the values of the Council, including the Oxford Living Wage as a minimum term of employment and excellent pensions.

Therefore the Council resolves to:

1.     ask the Head of Financial Services to ensure the Council’s procurement process is such that the Council could not undertake any contracts in future with organisations that cannot demonstrate that they treat their employees in line with the Councils aims and values, as Capita’s current practice would not be able to demonstrate,

2.     ask the Leader of the Council to write to the Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust Board and Oxfordshire County Council to urge them to use this opportunity to bring and keep outsourced services back in-house and commit to moving staff to the Oxford Living Wage as a minimum, and

3.     ask the Leader of the Council to write to Oxford’s MPs asking them to lend their support to this motion.

Minutes:

Councillor Landell-Mills left the chamber for the duration of this item, as he was employed by Capita although this motion did not directly impact on his disclosable pecuniary interest.

 

Councillor Iley-Williamson, seconded by Councillor Ladbrooke, proposed his submitted motion as set out in the agenda and briefing note.

 

Councillor Simmons , seconded by Councillor Thomas, proposed his submitted motion as set out in the briefing note.

 

After debate and on being put to the vote, the amendment was declared lost.

 

After debate and on being put to the vote, the original motion was agreed.

 

Council resolved to adopt the following motion as originally proposed:

 

The collapse of Carillion has left their workforce fearful of their jobs, wages, and pensions. It has also left the provision of vital services on the brink, with the absurdity of firefighters in Oxfordshire having to be on standby to ensure schoolchildren are fed.

It follows recent press reports of Oxfordshire County Council, South Oxfordshire Council, and the Vale of White Horse Council pulling out of outsourcing deals because of poor service delivery.

Another recent case of the dangers of outsourcing is that of Capita, which provides outsourced services in many parts of local government. It has recently announced that it will be closing its defined benefit pension scheme in its Life and Pensions Regulated Services division. This will substantially reduce its employees' expected pensions. 

This Council believes that any organisations which provide services on behalf of the council should reflect the values of the Council, including the Oxford Living Wage as a minimum term of employment and excellent pensions.

Therefore the Council resolves to:

1.     ask the Head of Financial Services to ensure the Council’s procurement process is such that the Council could not undertake any contracts in future with organisations that cannot demonstrate that they treat their employees in line with the Councils aims and values, as Capita’s current practice would not be able to demonstrate,

2.     ask the Leader of the Council to write to the Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust Board and Oxfordshire County Council to urge them to use this opportunity to bring and keep outsourced services back in-house and commit to moving staff to the Oxford Living Wage as a minimum, and

3.     ask the Leader of the Council to write to Oxford’s MPs asking them to lend their support to this motion.

 

84c

Fair employment: voluntary charter "Dying to Work"

Proposed by Councillor Wilkinson

Liberal Democrat member motion

This Council seeks to provide support and guidance to all its employees. In its Fair Employment Statement published in October 2016, the Rights and Responsibilities section makes it clear that:

“Every employee and potential employee has the right to be treated with dignity and respect and not to be discriminated against, victimised, bullied or harassed or to be treated less favourably than any other on any basis of any protected characteristic.”

It is acknowledged that unforeseen events can affect the lives of council workers, and that it is important that the Council does all that it can to maintain the dignity of staff who have been diagnosed with a terminal illness.

Council notes that the TUC’s Dying to Work campaign includes a voluntary charter for employers to sign which sets out an agreed way in which their employees will be supported, protected and guided through their employment, following a terminal diagnosis.

The charter states the following:

              We recognise that terminal illness requires support and understanding and not additional and avoidable stress and worry.

              Terminally ill workers will be secure in the knowledge that we will support them following their diagnosis and we recognise that, safe and reasonable work can help maintain dignity, offer a valuable distraction and can be therapeutic in itself.

              We will provide our employees with the security of work, peace of mind and the right to choose the best course of action for themselves and their families which helps them through this challenging period with dignity and without undue financial loss.

Council notes that a significant number of other city councils have signed up to this charter including Birmingham, Leicester, Liverpool and Sheffield.

This Council supports the TUC’s Dying to Work campaign so that all employees battling terminal illness have adequate employment protection and have their death in service benefits protected for the loved ones they leave behind.

Council therefore asks that the Interim CEO signs the Dying to Work voluntary charter on behalf of Oxford City Council to show its on-going commitment to supporting rights and responsibilities towards its staff.

It further requests that the Interim CEO of the City Council informs Oxfordshire County Council and the other district councils in Oxfordshire of its actions so that they may consider whether to follow its example.

 

References:

http://www.dyingtowork.co.uk/voluntary-charter/

http://www.dyingtowork.co.uk/charter-signatories/

 

Minutes:

Councillor Landell-Mills joined the meeting

 

Councillor Wilkinson, seconded by Councillor Goff, proposed her submitted motion as set out in the agenda and briefing note.

 

 

After debate and on being put to the vote, the motion was agreed.

 

Council resolved to adopt the following motion:

 

This Council seeks to provide support and guidance to all its employees. In its Fair Employment Statement published in October 2016, the Rights and Responsibilities section makes it clear that:

“Every employee and potential employee has the right to be treated with dignity and respect and not to be discriminated against, victimised, bullied or harassed or to be treated less favourably than any other on any basis of any protected characteristic.”

It is acknowledged that unforeseen events can affect the lives of council workers, and that it is important that the Council does all that it can to maintain the dignity of staff who have been diagnosed with a terminal illness.

Council notes that the TUC’s Dying to Work campaign includes a voluntary charter for employers to sign which sets out an agreed way in which their employees will be supported, protected and guided through their employment, following a terminal diagnosis.

The charter states the following:

              We recognise that terminal illness requires support and understanding and not additional and avoidable stress and worry.

              Terminally ill workers will be secure in the knowledge that we will support them following their diagnosis and we recognise that, safe and reasonable work can help maintain dignity, offer a valuable distraction and can be therapeutic in itself.

              We will provide our employees with the security of work, peace of mind and the right to choose the best course of action for themselves and their families which helps them through this challenging period with dignity and without undue financial loss.

Council notes that a significant number of other city councils have signed up to this charter including Birmingham, Leicester, Liverpool and Sheffield.

This Council supports the TUC’s Dying to Work campaign so that all employees battling terminal illness have adequate employment protection and have their death in service benefits protected for the loved ones they leave behind.

Council therefore asks that the Chief Executive signs the Dying to Work voluntary charter on behalf of Oxford City Council to show its on-going commitment to supporting rights and responsibilities towards its staff.

It further requests that the Chief Executive of the City Council informs Oxfordshire County Council and the other district councils in Oxfordshire of its actions so that they may consider whether to follow its example.

84d

Opposing expansion of Oxford Airport and proposed Oxford-Cambridge Expressway road

Proposed by Councillor Wolff, seconded by Councillor Simmons

Green member motion

Council notes the well-attended meeting on climate change held on 12th January 2018 at the Wesley Memorial Church organised by local campaigning groups and addressed by, amongst others, Oxford’s two MPs.

Council notes the concern expressed by one of the expert speakers, and in public questions, over the planned Oxford-Cambridge Expressway road, as well as the proposed expansion of the Oxford Airport, both incompatible with achieving climate change goals.

This Council believes that the planned Oxford/Cambridge corridor housing can, and must, be built sustainably including the provision of local facilities and public transport without encouraging car dependency. With respect to the airport, the capacity increases this will deliver, including the encouraging of disproportionately damaging short trips by air, will only lead to a net increase in transport emissions.

This Council has stated its commitment to climate change reduction on several occasions and recognises that all levels of Government must play their part in tackling climate change.

This Council therefore wishes to state its opposition to the Oxford Cambridge Expressway road plans and the expansion of Oxford airport and asks the Leader of the Council to write to the relevant ministers and Oxford’s MPs informing them of these views.

 

Minutes:

This motion was not taken because the time for discussing motions had elapsed.

84e

Sexual Harassment at Work

Proposed by Councillor Smith, seconded by Councillor Pressel

Labour member motion

Sexual Harassment at work is a problem in every kind of workplace from Hollywood Movie Studios to places a lot closer to home.  A 2016 report by the TUC in association with the everyday sexism project found that more than half (fifty two per cent) of all women polled have experienced some form of sexual harassment at work and four out of five women did not report the sexual harassment to their employer.

Just because sexual harassment in the workplace has proven to be a tough nut to crack, it does not mean it is an intractable problem. Action by employers, backed up by stronger legal protections for workers, better access to justice, and strong unions, are all part of the solution.

The TUC report 'Still just a bit of banter?' makes the following recommendations for employers, and as an employer we commit to following these principles when it comes to our own workforce. We also ask officers to devise procedures for encouraging our partners and contractors to abide by this best practice.

Decent jobs

Given the particular vulnerability of workers on casualised contracts, employers should aim to employ staff on permanent, secure contracts which offer decent hours and decent pay (ideally the Oxford Living Wage). Temporary contracts, zero-hours contracts, casual contracts and agency workers, should only be used by employers to respond to genuine peaks and troughs in demand or to match short-term skill needs.

Training

HR and all levels of management should receive training on sexual harassment, what constitutes sexual harassment, stalking and online harassment, relevant law and workplace policies, and how to respond to complaints of sexual harassment.

Clear policies

Employers should have a clear zero tolerance approach to sexual harassment. Use of social media and workplace equipment should be taken into consideration when formulating policies on sexual harassment. All employees should be made aware of these policies, reporting procedures and their rights and responsibilities regarding workplace sexual harassment. Where there is a recognised union, seeking input from union reps into the development of a sexual harassment policy is recommended. Employers should ensure that everyone working within their organisations can use grievance procedures to raise concerns about discrimination and harassment at work, including those on zero hours or casual contracts, agency workers and contractors who may be employed by another organisation. Policies should make specific provision to ensure that employees are protected from experiencing adverse outcomes after reporting workplace sexual harassment.

The report also makes a number of recommendations for government.

Council asks the Leader of the Council to write to our local members of parliament to ask them to work in parliament towards:

-       Reinstatement of third party harassment legislation

-       Reinstatement of employment tribunal powers to make wider recommendations

-       Reinstatement of Statutory Equality Questionnaire

-       Recognition and facility time for union equality reps

-       Extending the full range of statutory employment rights to all workers, regardless of employment status or type of  ...  view the full agenda text for item 84e

Minutes:

This motion was not taken because the time for discussing motions had elapsed.

84f

Phasing out unnecessary single-use plastics

Proposed by Councillor Brandt, seconded by Councillor Simmons

Green member motion

This Council resolves to:

Request the Executive Director for Sustainable City brings a report to CEB on the options for bringing an end to the use of unnecessary Single Use Plastics (SUP) in Oxford, to:

a)    enable Oxford City Council to become a full signatory of the ‘Plastic Free Pledge’, by phasing out the use of unnecessary SUPs in all City Council buildings, and working with commissioning partners to end the purchase and procurement of SUPs through the Council’s supply chain;

b)    encourage the city’s businesses, organisations and residents to go ‘plastic free,’ working with best practice partners in the city to explore the creation of a ‘plastic free network,’ that could provide business support, practical guidelines and advice to help local businesses transition from SUPs to sustainable alternatives;

c)    provide feasible options to incentivise traders on Council land to sell re-usable containers and invite customers to bring their own, with the aim of phasing out SUPs; including investigating the possibility of requiring food and drink vendors to avoid SUPs as a condition of their event permission, strengthening the existing conditions and guidance circulated to exhibitors and traders.

Supporting Information

There is a need to be aware of the damaging impact that Single Use Plastics (SUP) have on both our environment and public health, recognising that Oxford City Council has a key role to play in reducing plastic waste.

(1) Unnecessary (i.e. excluding medical items) Single-Use Plastics (SUP) used once before disposal e.g. bottles, cups and straws, are not widely recycled. SUPs can take up to 600 years to degrade, breaking into fragments that cause damage to the environment and permeate the food chain. A recent study [summarised and referenced in https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/sep/06/plastic-fibres-found-tap-water-around-world-study-reveals] found that 72% of U.K tap water samples were contaminated with plastic fibres, and a third of all fish caught off the British coast contained plastic.

(2) The Plastic Free Pledge encourages organisations and individuals to reduce SUP waste https://plasticfreepledge.com/ A petition calling on the Government to reduce and end SUPs here: http://bit.ly/2xSFLhs

(3) Several trailblazing businesses and organisations in and around the Country have already implemented plastic free alternatives

 

Minutes:

This motion was not taken because the time for discussing motions had elapsed.

84g

Call on Government to introduce a new Clean Air Act

Proposed by Councillor Wolff, seconded by Councillor Simmons

Green member motion

This Council is committed to improving air quality within the city, which currently breaches EU limits in some areas (the annual mean Air Quality Strategy objective for NO2 was breached at two out of three of the continuously monitored sites and 24% of the diffusion tube sites [Source: Oxford City Council 2016 Air Quality Annual Status Report; July 2017]). It recognises the need to take local action but also acknowledges that this can only take place within a supportive, national legal framework.

Currently, this is inadequate and lacking in many respects which is making the work of this Council in tackling poor air quality more challenging. This Council therefore calls upon the UK Government to introduce a new Clean Air Act which should include consideration of the following:

1.            Enshrine the right to breathe in UK law. Ensure the UK becomes a world leader in the new technologies and industries that will help us clean up our air.

2.            Expand ‘Clean Air Zones’: It should expand and strengthen the network of Clean Air Zones across the country - limiting the most polluting vehicles, including cars, from entering air pollution hot-spots - creating funding for local authorities to invest in walking, cycling and clean public transport. These should be strong enough to ensure legal compliance on NO2 by the end of 2018.

3.            Increase VED: It should increase the first year Vehicle Excise Duty on new diesel vehicles (except vans) by around £800, to reflect the additional cost to society of dirty diesel engines, raising £500m to help fund a targeted diesel scrappage scheme.

4.            Diesel Scrappage: It should introduce a targeted diesel scrappage scheme to take diesel vehicles off the road as soon as possible, and ensure that all those who live within Clean Air Zones can affordably replace polluting diesel vehicles. As well as offering replacement clean vehicles, these schemes should also offer alternatives such as car club membership and rail season tickets.

5.            Fine the Cheats: It should set out a plan for how companies who cheated emissions testing would be fined. Despite a $14.7bn settlement in the US, Volkswagen, for example, has yet to pay any damages in the EU - an equivalent fine in the UK could raise more than £8 billion from VW alone.

6.            Independent Regulation: It should guarantee the independence of the Vehicle Certification Agency - changing the way it is funded ensuring that the car industry doesn’t have a disproportionate influence on its activities.

7.            Monitor PollutionHotspots: It should ensure there is a comprehensive network of air monitoring stations in pollution hotspots - ensuring that air quality is monitored around hospitals, health clinics, and schools, so that those who are most vulnerable to the impacts of air pollution, notably children, the elderly and infirm, are protected.

8.            Active Transport: It should undertake a national review of transport system with serious investment  ...  view the full agenda text for item 84g

Minutes:

This motion was not taken because the time for discussing motions had elapsed.